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Should You Put Your Pit Bull on a Raw Food Diet?

By on May 18, 2014

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Before we dive into the information I want to make it clear that I am not a canine health professional nor do I claim to be an expert in the field of canine nutrition or biology. Therefore you should not take the information in this article as expert advice.

Should you put your Pit Bull on a raw food diet?

Short answer: Yes.

Feeding a raw diet offers a lot of advantages. Mainly you’re not feeding highly processed chemically enhanced food made up mainly of filler ingredients like corn. So …

What is a Raw Food Diet?

For the sake of this article we are specifically talking about raw meats, seafood, along with other foods like eggs and select vegetables.

Raw meat and seafood provides your Pit Bull Terrier with essential nutrients, vitamins, and nourishment that commercial dog foods lack due the way they are processed for packaging.

Raw food diets allow you to feed your dog fresh, non-chemically enhanced, foods that are not highly processed.

You do want to make sure you learn what foods to avoid too. For example you should avoid any kind of grains, corn, and soy beans.

One of the biggest misconceptions out there is that …

Raw Diets are Dangerous

While there are some risks associated with feeding a raw meat diet most of the “it’s dangerous don’t do it!” propaganda comes from dog food companies.

Truth is commercial dog food has only been around for 70 years or so. 70 years is no where near enough time to completely change a dogs biology.

Since commercial dog food has only been around for 70 years what did folks feed their dogs before commercial dog food? You guessed it. Raw meat, table scraps, or whatever the dog hunted themselves.

Since your dogs digestive system is largely unchanged from their ancestors raw meat, sea food, and other raw foods that would make a human sick are digested quite effortlessly by your dog.

Note: When you first start feeding your dog a raw food diet they will experience a detox. Stools are loose resembling mucus. Stools will smell worse. Your dogs breath may start to smell worse. Your dogs coat will get oily. All of these symptoms are quite normal. In most cases they last 7-10 days.

Owners who were not aware of the detox phase often timesput their dogs back on a commercial diet out of fear. Now that you have an idea of what to expect you can avoid doing that.

Common sense, educating yourself about the risks, and making sure you properly prepare meals for your dog reduce the risks significantly.

Benefits of a Raw Food Diet

Once the detox phase is over that’s when you’ll start to see improvements in your dogs behave like:

Better smelling breath.

Doggy breath isn’t always pleasant. You should see a fairly significant decrease in smelly breath.

Healthier coat.

Coat condition is one of the most noticeable improvements. Your dogs coat will have a healthy “glow” about it. You should also see a decrease in shedding. Pit Bulls are short haired dogs so they don’t blow their coats like a German Shepherd would. However, since they do have short hair the life of the hair is much shorter. Meaning, they sheds year around.

Pit Bull Terrier in Great Condition

Healthier teeth.

Raw diets promote minimal tartar buildup, and beautifully clean and healthy teeth; all without having to visit the doggie dentist or brushing their teeth yourself. Raw meaty bones are a great way to improve your dogs dental hygiene.

raw-food-diet-meaty-bones
Reduction in stool volume.

Since your dog is absorbing more nutrients you should see a fairly drastic decrease in going out to poop.

Less stool odor.

Odorous stools are a result of improper or incomplete digestion of nutrients. Decrease in odor is attributed to absorption of vital nutrients and a healthier digestive system.
Healthy, lean body mass.

Getting proper, fresh, food sheds away the fat and promotes muscle growth. Far to many dogs on commercial pet food are obese. While a lack of a consistent exercise routine plays a large role commercial dog food loaded with grains and “by products” is the real culprit here.

conditionedpitbullterrier

Stronger immune system.

Raw food diets contain a good balance of essential fatty acids and other immune normalizing and strengthening nutrients, it reduces inflammatory conditions and waves good-bye to infections.

Besides the most obvious benefits there are dozens if not hundreds other benefits like improved joint, ligament, tendon and bone health. You can

Learn more about feeding your Pit Bull a raw diet

One of the best resources I’ve found online for people like you and me who want to do all we can to give our dogs the best, healthiest life possible is a e-Book entitled, Going Rawr – A Complete Guide to Putting Your Dog on a Raw Diet by Maggie Rhines.

If you’re considering a raw diet I highly recommend this eBook. Maggie shares the in’s and out’s of the raw diet. How to transition your dog from commercial food to a raw diet properly so you avoid messing up their digestive system.

For more information click here.

If you want the best for your Pit Bull Terrier I encourage to get more information at the site above or your local bookstore. Either way, raw diets have been proven to be beter for your dog than commerical dog oof, even the high priced “premium” foods.

I would love to hear your thoughts on the raw diet. Leave a comment blow.

About Jason Mann

Jason Mann is the founder of PitBullLovers.com and retired professional dog trainer. He retired from Dog training in 2013 so he could devote more attention to PitBulllovers.com and helping Pit Bull owners around the world learn how to live a more peaceful life with their dogs as well as educate the general public about the true nature of these incredible canines.

7 Comments

  1. Doris

    May 18, 2014 at 6:55 pm

    I have 4 rescued Pit Bulls from a kill shelter. I feed them “Taste of the Wild” dry dog food and Buffalo ears for treats. It is the best I can afford…So I’m wondering if a raw meat diet would be much more expensive? Do you have any estimates of the monthly cost to feed my Pibbles? Logan weighs 90 lbs. Rocky weighs 58 lbs. JuJu weighs 45 lbs, Honeybear weighs 42 lbs. I am an older woman and hate feeling guilty…I love these dogs so much and need to know I’m doing my best for them.

  2. Lisa

    May 19, 2014 at 9:20 am

    Hi Jason, we have had our pitbulls on raw for about 4 years now. Our male’s skin was sensitive, so we had fed them a grain-free, “high-end” commercial dog food. I didn’t feel they were getting the best diet/nutrition, and was concerned over the food recalls that you constantly hear about, so we researched, and switched to raw. They do great on it. Their coats are beautiful, they look well, good muscle tone, small poop, which is a plus.Our one female was getting a little “chunky”, even on raw, so we cut back a little on her food, she has lost some weight, & is now running around like a puppy again, she’s about 6. It’s very easy to maintain a good weight on the dogs as you can easily adjust the amount they are getting a little more or a little less.

    It takes a little time to figure out a system of getting the food, preparing, freezing, etc. We typically order 2 months of food at a time, cut everything up, put in containers & freeze, then just take out what we need for a few days at a time. Once you have a system/routine, it’s pretty simple.

    Some may think it’s not sanitary, we’ve never had an issue. In the summer they eat outdoors, in the winter they usually plop their food on the kitchen floor, & I just clean up afterwards.

    I feel they are much healthier on the raw diet, and am pleased that we switched.

  3. Autumn

    May 19, 2014 at 10:16 am

    One must also be acutely aware of exactly where the meat comes from (directly from a farm, NEVER from the store) and how the animals are treated during life AND death. Don’t forget non-GMO veggies & eggs also directly from a farm! I haven’t yet read the e-book about raw diets for dogs, but it’s important that your readers understand the full extent of feeding their dogs a raw diet.

  4. Candie

    May 19, 2014 at 12:13 pm

    2012 I had to put my Lab to sleep because she had cancer in her pancreas (If caught in time, I probably could’ve saved her life). 6 Months later one of my Pit Bull boy was diagnose liver disease. And he was going down hill. The doctor put him on 6 to 8 medication a day for weeks.. that only lasted 3 days (plus their were bad sign effect that cause Liver damage !) On the 4 day… I change his life. I when to “Dog Gone Natural” He eats raw food, natural treats, takes probiotic, milk thistle, everything is all natural. I feed his brother same thing. Another thing he had really bad allergy, his paws, ears, shoulder would break out/bleed. He is healthy boy.
    Like they say animals eat other animals for survival and it has all the protein they need.

  5. Marilyn Lopes

    May 19, 2014 at 2:25 pm

    Hi Jason, Soooo glad to see this post – I’ve had both my dogs on a raw food diet for 4 years. It takes a lot of research & commitment but the results speak for themselves. For the meat I remove the skins of 6 chickens, chop & put them through a meat grinder, add 10 pounds each of turkey, lean ground beef, steak & other types of muscle meat. Bag up into gallon size bags & freeze. For the vegetable mixture I put the following through a food processor (washed & scrubbed well): yams (lots), carrots (lots), brocolli(not a lot), beets, turnips, parsley, bean sprouts, zuchinni, apples, pears, canned pumpkin (lots), garlic (in moderation it is NOT harmful), parsnips, & other seasonal veggies & fruits. I bag these into quart size zip-locks & freeze. This will last 6-7 weeks. When feeding I add the meat, the veggie mix, some yogurt, cottage cheese and canned salmon. 2-3 times a week I add an egg. I mix it all up in their stainlees steel bowls & heat it on the stovetop to a warm temp (should never be served cold). Immediately after, their bowls are scrubbed shiny clean.
    It took some time to get this down but now it takes only about 3 hours for each (start to clean-up). People can’t believe I do this but then they see how healthy my dogs are, how clean their teeth are, how tiny their stools are, how energetic they are & how incredibly beautiful their coats are.
    Also I have figured out the cost for this & it is aproximately $1.45-$1.70 per pound (hmmm, cheaper than most over-processed kibble!)
    Most people think I’m crazy for spending the time & I’ve had vets tell me I’m killing my dogs but the results don’t lie. And my dogs are worth it!!!
    Thanks Jason – love your newsletter. Actually now that I think about it I think I first heard about the BARF diet through you, then researched & read books for 6 months before making the switch. I could see the difference in the first week!!!

  6. Nicole

    May 19, 2014 at 10:28 pm

    My pit bulls are doing fabulous on the Whole prey model diet. They do not have bad breath at all, and the volume of stool is reduced so much. It does take a lot of research up front to ensure you know what is safe, and what they need. But once you got it down, it’s easy. It can be a lot of work, but their health and well being. I buy cases of meat from my butcher to reduce the costs, and then there is a lot of cutting up meat, packaging, freezing, thawing, etc. Not as easy as scooping the kibble. But so worth it. I get so many compliments on my dogs’s coat, and I credit that to his diet. I rarely bathe him, because I find he doesn’t need it, no smell, clean coat, etc. My other dog still needs it because he rolls in the dirt, but still 1 out of 2 ain’t bad!

  7. Jason Mann

    May 20, 2014 at 5:56 pm

    Raw diets can be a bit more on the pricey side but the foods you are purchasing now are a bit pricey too. If you shop around I’m sure you could find a butcher with quality meats for around the same price you’re paying for Taste of the Wild.

    You also have to take into consideration that since the food is more readily absorbed you are feeding less in the grand scheme of things.

    With all that said, research and decide what’s best for you and your dog.

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